Our April Planet Heroes: the Oceanic Society

Have you ever dreamt of having a whale in your bathtub? No? Well... Shameful to admit, but I did! Yet since I am not a small girl any more, I realized that I can take care of them in a different way as well. Through the ADOPTION OF A WHALE, so that they can roam free a little bit further than the bathtub edge.



This is why this month we decided to support the OCEANIC SOCIETY - our Planet Heroes this month. Since 1969, this organization has been inspiring and empowering people worldwide to take part in building a healthy future for the world’s oceans. And one of the things they enable is adopting a humpback whale to support their efforts. It is a non-profit organization that works to improve ocean health by deepening the connections between people and nature to address the root cause of its decline: human behavior.


But why is their mission so important?


People need healthy oceans. Oceans absorb heat, generate more than half of our atmosphere's oxygen, regulate the world's weather patterns, and more than a billion people depend on fish for their primary source of protein. An estimated 350 million jobs are linked to the oceans, and international trade in ocean products involves 85 nations and is worth $102 billion per year. Oceans also provide immeasurable financial, inspirational, and aesthetic benefits to people.


Yet the oceans are in trouble. 90 percent of fisheries are fully fished or overfished, and stocks of large fish like tuna and swordfish have declined by 90 percent since 1950. Climate change is bleaching coral reefs worldwide, and millions of tons of plastic are choking sea life and causing systemic problems. The oceans have reached a tipping point.


All ocean problems share a common cause: human behavior. In short, people put too much in and take too much out of the seas. Their solution is simple: change the human behaviors that damage ocean health, and the oceans will continue to thrive. (1)



90 percent of fisheries are fully fished or overfished, and stocks of large fish like tuna and swordfish have declined by 90 percent since 1950.

How are they going to achieve it?


We really like the Oceanic Society approach to the problem, which is really about the mindset change. Something we keep on working also through yoga. This non-profit organization works to improve ocean health by deepening the connections between people and nature to address the root cause of its decline: human behavior. They seek to bridge the gap between awareness and measurable behavior change in three ways:

  1. Connecting people to oceans through travel, and motivating personal actions to improve ocean health

  2. Defining and implementing strategies, tools, and methods to activate, sustain, and measure human behavior change

  3. Leveraging and amplifying our impacts to new audiences

Together, these strategies aim to "move the needle" in ways that measurably improve ocean health and reduce the hazards that humans pose to oceans over time. How cool is that?! (1)



We're here to help.


And that will one of a kind help. Ladies and Gentlemen, please meet the "Unnamed". Wait. What?! Yep, you read it right! This beautiful whale (or precisely the extension of the tail on this post) is still Unnamed by the scientists across the globe. This whale was first spotted the day after Christmas in 2009 in Puerto Vallarta. Then the Oceanic Society spotted it in March 2018 near Ixtapa in a competitive group with three other whales. It has also been spotted by the Farallon Islands twice, in 2011 and in 2015, wearing its summer coat of algae and feeding on the krill and sardines and anchovies that are abundant in the cold North Pacific waters off the West Coast of the U.S. This whale has a distinct notch in the upper right lobe of its fluke (or tail), which could have been caused by an entanglement in fishing gear or by a battle with other male humpback whales. (1)


So... Who's up for hopping on the mat to support in their efforts our Planet Heroes, the Oceanic Society? Let's do yoga and do good!


See you on the mat! Check the schedule here.


(1) Text quoted from: https://www.oceanicsociety.org/about

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